It’s funny because field sounds like a wrong past tense of feeling.

The current exhibition at Lucky’s Comics brings together four Vancouver-based artists working through expanded practices of sculpture and photography within a shared practice of documentation, exploring urban landscapes and architectures and creating narrative structures through static representations.

Lucky's Comics front of shop has enough art on the walls to be mistaken for the gallery.

Lucky's Comics front of shop has enough art on the walls to be mistaken for the gallery.

Hartbraker came out to the opening on Friday, January 15, and was kind enough to document the event.

The first thing one saw, or was blinded by, was the light shining in through the window, directly at the entrance to the exhibition. In place for opening night as part of an installation by Emiliano Sepulveda, the direction of light is simply a continuation of an ongoing project of collecting light, as a sculptural object, or instance. This collection of light initially took the form of methodical walks around the city, documenting the duration by means of a camera with an always open shutter, and creating a sort of unusable map of the objects and spaces of the journey. Later on, the documentation came to include collections of objects, re-creations of spaces, drawing, writing, and finally the replacement of the camera with individual sheets of photographic paper, rolled up, and carried as a walking stick, absorbing the light, the weather, and the sweat from the artist’s hand.

Threads. Linkages. Lines of light leading to vessels (translocation/spatial simultaneity study), by Emiliano Sepulveda

Threads. Linkages. Lines of light leading to vessels (translocation/spatial simultaneity study), by Emiliano Sepulveda

Henry Murphy’s path around the city might overlap with Sepulveda’s, but their conclusions couldn’t be more different. Murphy uses a variety of cameras and film, but snapshot and set-up alike, each of his photographs are characterized by a quiet persistence to arrangement, and a keen observance of space and self. The simplicity of the final image betrays none of the work: dozens of photographs on single questions, to find the best expression of an instance of fulfillment,┬áto take away an understanding, not an answer.

Untitled (rear window with condensation), by Henry Murphy.

Untitled (rear window with condensation), by Henry Murphy.

Intended to be taken away as souvenirs from the gallery, Daniel Oates-Kuhn’s multi-coloured photocopied pamphlets are representatives of an amateur form of dissemination of information, more frequently found in libraries or community halls. As repositories for thematic propaganda and instruction, Oates-Kuhn’s three volumes, collected under the title “Understanding forms of provisional coverage,” are nothing if not provisional themselves. The text provides a bare understanding of the photographs, documents of temporary installments around construction sites, large and small. This ambiguity calls attention to Oates-Kuhn’s own practice as a sculptor, wherein these documents serve as studies for larger works.

Understanding forms of provisional coverage, vols. 1-3, by Daniel Oates-Kuhn

Understanding forms of provisional coverage, vols. 1-3, by Daniel Oates-Kuhn

“Untitled (Attempt 1)” by John Burgess, is a discrete object that escaped documentation. Within a practice characterized by its concern with the optical experience of physical spaces, this can only be seen as encouragement to come out and see, or feel, it yourself.

Lucky’s Comics is open Monday to Saturday from noon to six, and Sundays from noon to five, located at 3972 Main street, half a block down from The Regional Assembly of Text. Not a field, a feeling closes Sunday, January 31.

The gallery at Lucky’s Comics has been around for about nine years: initially a wall in the front of the store, at some point it usurped the entire back room. The original curator, Owen Plummer, put up other people’s shows for years, all the while maintaining an active art practice: he came back to Lucky’s in October of last year to show work related to a recent collaboration with Luella. Lief Hall put up great shows for a year or two, made something of an archive, and has moved on to Nouvelle Nouvelle, where she’s opening a group exhibition of mobile art this Friday, come out!

Photos by Hartbraker, words by Bernstein.

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